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Sharing our love for authors, and the stories they are inspired to tell.

W… W… W… Wednesdays

Image for weekly meme W... W... W...This weekly meme, hosted by MizB, over at ‘Should Be Reading’, is a snapshot of where I am at in my reading schedule.

To play along, just answer the following three questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

.

As I probably won’t be able to contribute every week, I have taken the liberty of adding in a couple more W…’s, which came to mind.

   …

As ‘Primal’, which was scheduled to be my next read, was sent by the author as a PDF for the computer, there has been a slight change to my reading order, as I have been out of town and haven’t been able to access the file. Therefore, I apologise if my entries this week may seem a little out of sync with some of my previous W… W… W… posts.

What are you currently reading?

‘Gifts Of The Peramangk’ by Dean Mayes

In 1950s Australia, during the height of the divisive White Australia Policy, Virginia, a young Aboriginal girl is taken from her home and family and put to work on an isolated, outback station, in the cruelest of conditions. Her only solace: the violin, taught to her in secret by a kind-hearted white woman – the wife of the abusive station owner. However, Virginia’s prodigious musical gift cannot save her from years of hardship, abuse, and racism.

 Decades later, her eight year old granddaughter, Ruby, plays the violin with a passion Virginia once possessed. Amidst abject poverty, domestic violence and social dysfunction, Ruby escapes her circumstance through her practice, with her grandmother’s frail, guiding hand. Ruby’s zeal attracts the attention of an enigmatic music professor, and with his help, Ruby embarks on an incredible journey of musical discovery that will culminate in a once in a life time chance for a brighter future. But with two cultural worlds colliding, her gift and her ambition will be threatened by deeply ingrained distrust, family jealousies and tragic secrets that will define her very identity.

What did you recently finish reading?

‘Bohemia’ by Veronika Carnaby

Amazon ImageDon’t miss out on Veronika Carnaby’s thrilling new read for the modern beatnik, in which she provides a wild, unrestrained account of ’60s counterculture youth bursting out of their creative shells. In her debut novel, Veronika Carnaby picks up where the Beat Generation left off. Set in 1960, Bohemia chronicles a group of twenty-somethings who defy the “ideals” of a mid-twentieth century society to seek creative fulfillment. In the process, they spotlight the creative path that artists of all mediums tread, all the while depicting the challenges faced by youth in the decade that changed the world.

What do you think you’ll read next?

‘Primal’ by Deborah Serra

Amazon ImageWith everything at stake, what are you capable of?  What if the worst happens and you are not a policeman, or a spy with weapons training and an iron heart?

In this gritty crime thriller a family vacation takes a vicious turn when a fishing camp is invaded by four armed men.  With nothing except her brains, her will, and the element of surprise on her side, Alison must kill or watch her family die – and then things get worse.

What was the last book you reviewed?

‘The Englishman And The Butterfly’ by Ryan Asmussen

Amazon ImageOxford fellow and John Milton expert, Professor Henry Fell, suffers from panic attacks and a gnawing fear that what he doubtfully refers to as his existence is much more out of his control than he realizes.

Newly arrived in Boston on an academic fellowship, Fell meets a variety of people who, in one way or another, expose him to true love, true death, and true poetry: the lovely and sharp-tongued Julia Collins, a Ph.D. candidate struggling to survive in a male-dominated world, fellow Brit Professor Geoffrey Hearne, one of the University’s most popular and colorful lecturers, and the rather less-than-popular, equally British, Professor Christopher Moberley, whose vast bulk contains the darkest of secrets.

A coming of middle-age story, a metaphysical parable, a glimpse into literature from the inside-out, ‘The Englishman and the Butterfly’, is a tragicomic look at the differences between imagining a life, performing one, and becoming enlightened to the possibility that there is more to life than meets a reader’s eye.

You can read my review post here.

 …

What book review are you working on now?

‘Kiss Of the Butterfly’ by James Lyon

Amazon ImageMeticulously researched, “Kiss of the Butterfly” weaves together intricate threads from the 15th, 18th and 20th centuries to create a rich phantasmagorical tapestry of allegory and reality. It is about divided loyalties, friendship and betrayal, virtue and innocence lost, obsession and devotion, desire and denial, the thirst for life and hunger for death, rebirth and salvation. “Kiss” blends history and the terrors of the Balkans as it explores dark corners of the soul, from medieval Bosnia to enlightenment-era Vienna, from the bright beaches of modern-day Southern California to the exotically dark cityscapes of Budapest and Belgrade, and horrors of Bosnia.

“Kiss of the Butterfly” is based on true historical events. In the year of his death, 1476, the Prince of Wallachia — Vlad III (Dracula) — committed atrocities under the cloak of medieval Bosnia’s forested mountains, culminating in a bloody massacre in the mining town of Srebrenica. A little over 500 years later, in July 1995, history repeated itself when troops commanded by General Ratko Mladic entered Srebrenica and slaughtered nearly 8,000 people, making it the worst massacre Europe had seen since the Second World War. For most people, the two events seemed unconnected…

Vampires have formed an integral part of Balkan folklore for over a thousand years. “Kiss” represents a radical departure from popular vampire legend, based as it is on genuine Balkan folklore from as far back as the 14th century. “Kiss of the Butterfly” offers up the vampires that existed long before Dracula and places them within a modern spectrum.

Stop by and leave a link to your own reading schedule, I can’t wait to visit and check them all out!

 

Written by
Yvonne

I can’t remember a time, even as a child, when I haven’t been passionate about books and reading.
I began blogging, when I realised just how many other people out there shared my passion for the written word and I have been continually amazed at the wealth of books that are available and the amount of great new friends I have made, from literally 'The Four Corners Of The World'.

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6 comments
    • Hi Naida,

      Tuesday is nearly over (it is 10.15pm here) thank goodness, as it has been a very hectic day and unfortunately tomorrow is set to be even more stressful!

      By rights, I should have been reading ‘Primal’ right now, but I have had to swap a couple of books around, so I am making sure that it is definitely next on the list. ‘Gifts Of The Peramangk’ is more than making up for the disappointment though, so all is not lost!

      ‘Kiss Of the Butterfly’ is proving to be quite a challenging review to write, as there are so many sides to this deep and disturbing story. It is easily my top read of the year so far though and I hope to get the final post published very soon.

      Thanks for stopping by, you know how much I always value your comments.

  • Liking the sound of Primal and I’m so looking forward to your review of Kiss Of the Butterfly as, still undecided as to whether or not to reserve a copy at the library, I have a feeling your thoughts on it might help me make up my mind.

    • Hi Tracy,

      I am working on the review, I promise. It is just that with having been away for the last week, things are now a bit hectic whilst I try to catch up with everything and the blog has to be put on the back burner for a while. I honestly think that you would enjoy ‘Kiss Of The Butterfly’ though and if you do get the chance to reserve it at the library, I would go for it … although of course, that is just my opinion!

      I was gutted that I couldn’t get to read ‘Primal’ when I had planned to, but I never even considered the consequences of going away when I scheduled it in. It is definitely back on track for my next read and ‘Gifts Of The Peramangk’ is turning into a worthy substitute, so I am not too disapppointed with the wait.

      Thanks for stopping by and I will let you know when the review goes live.

  • Hi Yvonne!

    Your books sound really interesting. I particularly like the sound of Primal. I hope that you enjoy it when you get round to reading it. Kiss of The Butterfly has such a gorgeous cover. I’m a sucker for a good cover.

    Hope you have a great week! Happy Reading

Written by Yvonne

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