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Sharing our love for authors, and the stories they are inspired to tell.

Wondrous Words Wednesday
New To Me Words

 

This would usually be my post as part of the ‘Wondrous Words Wednesday’ meme, which is hosted by the lovely Kathy @ BermudaOnion blog. However, it looks as though Kathy is taking a well-earned hiatus, so I am sending her all Best Wishes and hope to have her back again very soon, she is sorely missed 🙂

I have so many new to me words stacking up, that I thought I would share just a few of them with you anyway, in the hope that Kathy won’t mind too much!

Image of an open book showing words, with a small purple sprig led across the pages - used for the meme Wondrous Words Wednesday

This period murder/mystery has certainly brought forth a real plethora of new to me words!

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

“The typography was too grand and overreaching for the simple poems, Julia could see now, and the only illustration shamelessly modelled after Bruce Roger’s Ronsard to frame the title and colophon, but she loved the little book regardless.”

“Philip allowed Julia to keep what she wished from the library – she’d selected a quarto German incunable with picaresque woodcuts and the prize little Aldine 16mos (none of which she could read, then or now).

“Feeling like a pampered odalisque (albeit in a lemon shantung morning frock), Julia again surveyed the room.”

“It was soon clear that Mrs. Warde was the most knowledgeable bookman in the room. She talked of Updike and Rogers, Goudy and Rollins, and a type and lettering man named Bill Dwiggins whose work might outshine them all. As if they’d been friends for years, Bea and Julia began to trade book hound gossip: of misspelled vanity watermarks; of the binder who boxed up the trimmed deckles as per his client’s instructions to save them …”

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

COLOPHON

In publishing, a colophon is a brief statement containing information about the publication of a book, such as the place of publication, the publisher, and the date of publication. A colophon may also be emblematic or pictorial in nature. Colophons were formerly printed at the ends of books, but in modern works they are usually located at the verso of the title-leaf.

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

INCUNABLE

An incunable, or sometimes incunabulum, is a book, pamphlet, or broadside printed in Europe before the 16th century. Incunabula are not manuscripts, which are documents written by hand. As of 2014, there are about 30,000 distinct known incunable editions extant, but the probable number of surviving copies in Germany alone is estimated at around 125,000. Through statistical analysis, it is estimated that the number of lost editions is at least 20,000.

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

ODALISQUE

An odalisque was a chambermaid or a female attendant in a Turkish seraglio, particularly the court ladies in the household of the Ottoman sultan.

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

DECKLES

A deckle is a removable wooden frame or “fence” used in manual papermaking.

In a related sense, it can also mean deckle edge paper—a type of industrially produced paper with rough cut, distressed edges used in the book trade.

Deckle can also refer to the fatty part of a cut of brisket.

Cover image of the book 'Relative Fortunes' by the author Marlowe Benn

In fact, make that five words for today’s post, as I have just spotted another new to me word in one of the definition sentences:

“An odalisque was a chambermaid or a female attendant in a Turkish seraglio, particularly the court ladies in the household of the Ottoman sultan.”

SERAGLIO – A seraglio or serail is the sequestered living quarters used by wives and concubines in an Ottoman household. 

Image of an open book showing words, with a small purple sprig led across the pages - used for the meme Wondrous Words Wednesday

Written by
Yvonne

I can’t remember a time, even as a child, when I haven’t been passionate about books and reading.
I began blogging, when I realised just how many other people out there shared my passion for the written word and I have been continually amazed at the wealth of books that are available and the amount of great new friends I have made, from literally 'The Four Corners Of The World'.

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6 comments
  • I think I heard deckles before, when I saw a documentary on the history of wallpaper, but the rest are new words for me too. Thanks for sharing them. I don’t imagine I will remember any of them, but I hope so anyway.

    • Hi Anca,

      You have no idea of how many new words I come across where I think ‘I will remember that one’, only to have forgotten it almost instantly.

      I am also always amazed at just how many words are out there that I don’t know about, when I thought that my grasp of the English language was reasonably good.

      The fact that some of today’s words are also ‘book’ related, is an added bonus.

      I only knew of ‘deckles’ from its alternative definition as a fatty cut of meat!

      Thanks for stopping by and I hope that all is well with you. Thanks for the follow on Twitter too! 🙂

  • A great set of words, Yvonne! I already knew seraglio (it was used in several books I read many years ago and has stuck with me), but the rest are new to me. Well… I’d heard “deckle” used in the meat sense, but not as you’ve share it here.

    This is always such a fun meme…. even if I forget them in short order!

    • Hi Kelly,

      I am so rubbish at remembering some of the words I share, that I have now had to resort to ‘tagging’ them, so that I don’t duplicate them!

      I’m sure that one or two of the new to me words stick in my tiny, muddled mind, but when I do some of the daily online crosswords I have become addicted to since lockdown, I really do wonder! There are some great unknown treasures which come up from time to time!

      It seemed really strange publishing this post without linking to my regular meme host, Kathy. She has so much going on in her life right now and has completely lost her reading mojo, which is such a shame. I’m sure it is only temporary and hopefully she will soon be back here amongst friends 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and I hope that all is well with you 🙂

    • Hi Nikki,

      Everything is good down here in Frome, thanks for asking and I hope that you are all staying safe also 🙂

      I didn’t know ‘deckle’ in the context of printing, but from its alternative definition, in connection with meat, although why that would be I don’t quite know, as I never buy meat with an ounce of fat on it! In fact, we generally stick to fish and chicken most of the time – I don’t think I could ever go completely vegetarian though!

      I’m surprised that you didn’t know the first couple of print related words too, although judging from the context in which they were used and the time period in which the story is set, they may be more to do with antiquarian books, than anything still in use in the print industry today.

      Thanks for stopping by and have a good weekend 🙂

Written by Yvonne

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