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Sharing our love for authors, and the stories they are inspired to tell.

Wondrous Words Wednesday

An image for the weekly meme Wondrous Words Wednesday… Is a weekly meme where we share new (to us) words that we have encountered in our reading.It is hosted by Kathy, over at ‘BermudaOnion’s Weblog’.You can either stop by and leave a link to your own ‘mystery’ words of the week, or just browse the eclectic mix of words that others have discovered, there is always a great selection.

Don’t forget that Kathy and the rest of us, all love to read your comments  as well, so that we can visit and share your words of the week!

1. My first word this week, comes from the book I am currently reading, ‘Zaremba, or Love in the Rule of Law’, an excellent work of literary fiction, set in Poland …

FAROUCHE

She was beautiful, in a rather exotic and farouche way, but as no one had bothered to tell her so, except a collection of elderly aunts and other such persons of suspect judgment, she did not know it.

FAROUCH

Sullen or shy in company.

Socially inept.

Fierce; wild.

2. My next couple of words, are in fact the title of a book, featured by Lianne, on her excellent blog ‘caffeinatedlife.net’ Whilst this is definitely a book which falls into the realms of fantasy and therefore not something which I would typically read, unless asked to do so as part of an author review request, I was nonetheless intrigued enough to research the title, if only initially to satisfy myself that they were in fact genuine and defined words …

GOLEM and JINNI

New York, 1899. Two strangers, one destiny. Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic. When her master, the husband who commissioned her, dies at sea on the voyage from Poland, she is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York in 1899. Ahmad is a djinni, a being of fire, born in the ancient Syrian desert. Trapped in an old copper flask by a Bedouin wizard centuries ago, he is released accidentally by a tinsmith in a Lower Manhattan shop. Though he is no longer imprisoned, Ahmad is not entirely free – an unbreakable band of iron binds him to the physical world. The Golem & The Djinni is their magical, unforgettable story; unlikely friends whose tenuous attachment challenges their opposing natures – until the night a terrifying incident drives them back into their separate worlds. But a powerful threat will soon bring Chava and Ahmad together again, challenging their existence and forcing them to make a fateful choice.

GOLEM

A mechanism that can move automatically. In Jewish folklore, an artificially created human supernaturally endowed with life.

JINNI

A being or spirit in Muslim belief who could assume human or animal form and influence man by supernatural powers

3. My last couple of words this time, come from the blog of two fantastic authors and fun bloggers, Carolyn J. Rose and her husband Mike Nettleton, jointly known as ‘Deadly Duo Mysteries’. Mike had written his own take on fun words in reading and I just couldn’t resist sharing them with you, as a couple of them in particular just ‘cracked me up’!

Check out Carolyn and Mike’s latest jointly authored book … ‘Deception At Devil’s Harbor’

BLOVIATE and HORNSWOGGLE

A PROVERB FOR BLOVIATION AFFLICTED SOULS by George Eliot, Victorian English Novelist … “Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving worldly evidence of the fact”.

BLOVIATE

To discourse at length in a pompous or boastful manner.

No one knows the origin of hornswoggle. We do know that it belongs to a group of “fancified” words that were particularly popular in the American West in the 19th century. Hornswoggle is one of the earliest, first appearing around 1829. It is possible that these words were invented to poke fun at the more “sophisticated” East.

HORNSWOGGLE

To bamboozle; deceive.

What new words have you discovered this time … I can’t wait to stop by and check them out!

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Written by
Yvonne

I can’t remember a time, even as a child, when I haven’t been passionate about books and reading.
I began blogging, when I realised just how many other people out there shared my passion for the written word and I have been continually amazed at the wealth of books that are available and the amount of great new friends I have made, from literally 'The Four Corners Of The World'.

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Written by Yvonne

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